Joint/Combined Exercises & Training (JCET)

A large part of the SOF mission is to conduct military training with other nation’s armed forces. This is usually done through Security Assistance Programs administered by the State Department and governed by Title 22 of the U.S. Code. Generally, Title 10 money cannot be used for Security Assistance purposes. There are some exceptions to this (such as 1208, 1206, or CCIF funding, discussed elsewhere). Another exception to this rule is located at 10 U.S.C. 2011.

A large part of the SOF mission is to conduct military training with other nation’s armed forces. This is usually done through Security Assistance Programs administered by the State Department and governed by Title 22 of the U.S. Code. Generally, Title 10 money cannot be used for Security Assistance purposes. There are some exceptions to this (such as 1208, 1206, or CCIF funding, discussed elsewhere). Another exception to this rule is located at 10 U.S.C. 2011. This section allows special operations forces assigned to a combatant commander to train with the forces of a “friendly country,” when the primary benefit of such training is to train U.S. special operations forces.

REFERENCES

  • 10 U.S.C. 2011, Special Operations Forces: Training With Friendly Foreign Forces
  • SOCOM Directive 350-3, JCET, 18 May 2004 (unclassified, but not available on NIPR)
  • PACOM Instruction 3550.2A, PACOM JCET Program (unclassified, but not available on NIPR)
  • EUCOM Directive 55-22, Special Operations Joint Combined Exercise Training (JCET), 1 Jun 00
  • General Accounting Office Report: JCET Management and Oversight, July 1999
  • Congressional Research Service Report: JCET and Human Rights — Background and Issues for Congress, January 1999